Content (Walter Janes)

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  • (Posted 2016-07-16)   CPDL #40391:       
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2016-07-16).   Score information: Letter, 1 page, 66 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Oval note edition. All five stanzas included. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
  • (Posted 2016-07-16)   CPDL #40390:   
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2016-07-16).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 67 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Note shapes added (4-shape). All five stanzas included.

General Information

Title: Content
First Line: Since God is all my trust
Composer: Walter Janes
Lyricist: Tate and Bradycreate page

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: Sacred   Meter: 66. 86 (S.M.)

Language: English
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1803 in The Massachusetts Harmony, p. 32

Description: Words adapted (apparently by Janes himself) from Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady, New Version, paraphrase of Psalm 11, in seven stanzas. Janes has conflated the first line of the stanza, converting the meter from the Common Meter (86. 86) of Tate and Brady to Short Meter (66. 86).

External websites:

Original text and translations

Original text and translations may be found at Psalm 11.

English.png English text

Janes, 1803 (66. 86.)
1. Since God is all my trust,
A refuge always nigh,
Why should I, like a timorous bird,
To distant mountains fly?
Adapted for these editions (66. 86.)
2. The wicked bend their bow,
And ready fix their dart;
Lurking in ambush to destroy
The man of upright heart.

3. When once assurance fails
Which public faith imparts,
'Tis time for innocence to fly
From such deceitful arts.

4. He hath a temple here,
And righteous throne above,
Whence he surveys the sons of men,
And how their counsels move.

 

Tate and Brady, 1698 (86. 86.)
Since I have placed my trust in God,
A refuge always nigh,
Why should I, like a timorous bird,
To distant mountains fly?

Behold, the wicked bend their bow,
And ready fix their dart;
Lurking in ambush to destroy
The man of upright heart.

When once the firm assurance fails
Which public faith imparts,
'Tis time for innocence to fly
From such deceitful arts.

The Lord hath both a temple here,
And righteous throne above,
Whence he surveys the sons of men,
And how their counsels move.

 

Adapted for these editions (66. 86.)
5. If righteous God he loves,
For trial does correct;
What must the sons of violence,
Whom he abhors, expect?

6. Snares and fire and brimstone
Shall in one tempest shower;
This dreadful mixture his revenge
Into their cup shall pour.

7. The Lord will righteous deeds
With signal favor grace;
And to the upright man disclose
The brightness of his face.

 

Tate and Brady, 1698 (86. 86.)
If God the righteous, whom he loves,
For trial does correct;
What must the sons of violence,
Whom he abhors, expect?

Snares, fire, and brimstone on their heads
Shall in one tempest shower;
This dreadful mixture his revenge
Into their cup shall pour.

The righteous Lord will righteous deeds
With signal favor grace;
And to the upright man disclose
The brightness of his face.