Difference between revisions of "Nahum Tate"

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Nahum Tate was [[wikipedia:Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom|Poet Laureate]] from 1690 to 1715, and wrote the libretto for [[Henry Purcell]]'s ''[[Dido and Aeneas]]''. He was the co-author, with [[Nicholas Brady]], of ''A new version of the psalms of David, fitted to the tunes used in churches'', which was first published in 1696. This collection's title was usually shortened to 'the New Version'. As such, it was contrasted with the 'Old Version', the metrical psalter based on the work of [[Thomas Sternhold]] and [[John Hopkins]], and published by [[wikipedia:John Day (printer)|John Day]] as ''The whole booke of psalmes'' in 1562: together, the 'Old Version' and 'New Version' were the main metrical psalters used in English parish churches in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  
 
Nahum Tate was [[wikipedia:Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom|Poet Laureate]] from 1690 to 1715, and wrote the libretto for [[Henry Purcell]]'s ''[[Dido and Aeneas]]''. He was the co-author, with [[Nicholas Brady]], of ''A new version of the psalms of David, fitted to the tunes used in churches'', which was first published in 1696. This collection's title was usually shortened to 'the New Version'. As such, it was contrasted with the 'Old Version', the metrical psalter based on the work of [[Thomas Sternhold]] and [[John Hopkins]], and published by [[wikipedia:John Day (printer)|John Day]] as ''The whole booke of psalmes'' in 1562: together, the 'Old Version' and 'New Version' were the main metrical psalters used in English parish churches in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.  
 
 
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Revision as of 01:12, 6 March 2017

Life

Born: 1652

Died: 1715

Biography

Nahum Tate was Poet Laureate from 1690 to 1715, and wrote the libretto for Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas. He was the co-author, with Nicholas Brady, of A new version of the psalms of David, fitted to the tunes used in churches, which was first published in 1696. This collection's title was usually shortened to 'the New Version'. As such, it was contrasted with the 'Old Version', the metrical psalter based on the work of Thomas Sternhold and John Hopkins, and published by John Day as The whole booke of psalmes in 1562: together, the 'Old Version' and 'New Version' were the main metrical psalters used in English parish churches in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

View the Wikipedia article on Nahum Tate.

Musical settings of literary works

Settings of text by Nahum Tate

Publications

External links

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