Difference between revisions of "Non nobis Domine (Anonymous)"

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(restored edition information that had been overwritten by Humphreys)
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'''Instruments:''' {{acap}}<br>
 
'''Instruments:''' {{acap}}<br>
  
'''Description:''' This famous canon at the fifth and unison or octave is now generally accepted by musicologists as ''not'' having been written by Byrd:
+
'''Description:''' This famous canon at the fifth and unison or octave is now generally accepted by musicologists as ''not'' having been written by [[William Byrd]] (1542/3&ndash;1623); the late, eminent Byrd specialist Philip Brett came to the view that most of the canons attributed to Byrd were spurious.<br>
Recent research has shown that the two related figures which form the basis of the ''Non nobis Domine'' canon were extracted from the motet ''Aspice Domine'' (a5) by [[Philip van Wilder]] (c. 1500-1554). In the motet both figures are set to the text-phrase ''Non est qui consoletur'' ('there is none to console') which was presumably the text to which the original version of the canon was sung by the Elizabethan recusant community as an expression of nostalgia for the old religious order.   The ''Non nobis Domine'' text to which the canon is sung today was apparently taken from the first collect from the thanksgiving service added to the Book of Common Prayer to celebrate the thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot on 5 November 1605.   The earliest source of the canon dates from 1620 to 1625 and is preserved in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, in the "Bull" manuscript, MS 782, f.122v, where it is anonymous, unbarred and untexted. It is however clear from the repeated notes and the contour of the melody that this version was already designed to fit the ''Non nobis Domine'' text, which was evidently sung in a spirit of thanksgiving for deliverance.   The canon was published anonymously in three 17th century collections, yet the earliest attribution to a specific composer was made as late as 1715 by Thomas Tudway, who ascribed it to [[Morley]]; the woefully inaccurate Dr Pepusch ascribes it to Byrd in his 1731 ''Treatise on Harmony''; and in 1739 the theme is quoted in a concerto by Count Unico Willem van Wassenaer (formerly attributed to [[Pergolesi]]) as ''Canone di [[Palestrina]]''! The canon is known to have been admired by [[Mozart]] and [[Beethoven]], whomever its composer was. &mdash; ''by [[user:Philip Legge|Philip Legge]]'' ''(aditions by [[user:David Humphreys|David Humphreys]])''
+
Recent research has shown that the two related figures which form the basis of the ''Non nobis, Domine'' canon were extracted from the 5-voice motet ''Aspice Domine'' by [[Philip van Wilder]] (''c''. 1500&ndash;1554). In the motet both figures are set to the text-phrase ''Non est qui consoletur'' (“there is none to console”) which was presumably the text to which the original version of the canon was sung by the Elizabethan recusant community as an expression of nostalgia for the old religious order. The ''Non nobis, Domine'' text to which the canon is sung today was apparently taken from the first collect from the thanksgiving service added to the Book of Common Prayer to celebrate the thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot on 5 November 1605.<br>
 +
The earliest source of the canon dates from 1620 to 1625 and is preserved in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, in the “Bull” manuscript, MS 782, f.122v, where it is anonymous, unbarred and untexted. It is however clear from the repeated notes and the contour of the melody that this version was already designed to fit the ''Non nobis, Domine'' text, which was evidently sung in a spirit of thanksgiving for deliverance.<br>
 +
The canon was published anonymously in three 17th century collections, yet the earliest attribution to a specific composer was made as late as 1715 by Thomas Tudway, who ascribed it to [[Morley]]; the woefully inaccurate Dr Pepusch ascribes it to Byrd in his 1731 ''Treatise on Harmony''; and in 1739 the theme is quoted in a concerto by Count Unico Willem van Wassenaer (formerly attributed to [[Pergolesi]]) as ''Canone di [[Palestrina]]''! The canon is known to have been admired by [[Mozart]] and [[Beethoven]], whomever its composer was. ''[[user:Philip Legge|Philip Legge]] with additions by [[user:David Humphreys|David Humphreys]]''
  
 
==Original text and translations==
 
==Original text and translations==

Revision as of 06:55, 4 May 2010

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  • CPDL #17430: Icon_pdf_globe.gif Icon_snd_globe.gif LilyPond Network.png Part Midis Available
Editor: Aaron Elkiss (submitted 2008-07-03).   Score information: Letter, 1 page, 104 kB    Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes:
  • CPDL #10914: Network.pngMIDI and NoteWorthy Composer files available.
Editor: Brian Russell (submitted 2006-02-03).   Score information: Letter, 3 pages, 36 kB    Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes:
Editor: Philip Legge (submitted 2006-01-15).   Score information: A4, 3 pages, 96 kB    Copyright: 2006 Philip Legge
Edition notes: Included in the TUMS Busking Book, arranged for SAB. PDF also contains a setting of the same text by Philip Legge, and Fine knacks for ladies by John Dowland. This edition was made directly from the facsimile reprint in Musical Times volume 113 (1972), page 856, by transposing down a perfect fourth (for the soprano) and quartering the note values.
  • CPDL #10618: Icon_pdf.gif
Editor: Paul Cienniwa (submitted 2006-01-07).   Score information: Letter, 1 page, 22 kB    Copyright: Personal: to be used freely
Edition notes: This three-part canon is arranged for SAB.
  • CPDL #6783: Network.png
Editor: John D. Smith (submitted 2004-02-25).   Score information: A4, 1 page    Copyright: Personal
Edition notes: Scores listed alphabetically by composer. All scores available in Scorch format, some are also available as PDF files.
  • CPDL #5935: Network.png Scorch, MIDI and Sibelius 2 files available.
Editor: Bettina Blokland (submitted 2003-11-06).   Score information: A4, 1 page    Copyright: Personal
Edition notes: Scorch plugin required. To view scores and midi files click on letter at bottom of page which matches composer's last name.
Editor: Stuart McIntosh (submitted 2002-06-24).   Score information: Letter, 3 pages, 84 kB    Copyright: Personal
Edition notes: Realised for 3 voices, SABar. Score reposted July 14, 2004. Includes a keyboard reduction of the a cappella choral score.
  • CPDL #3618: Network.png PDF file.
Editor: Rod Mather (submitted 2002-05-25).   Copyright: Personal
Edition notes: Includes a keyboard reduction of the a cappella choral score. Realised for 4 voices, SATB.

General Information

Title: Non nobis, Domine

Dubious.gif

This work has been misattributed.
See notes for details and correct composer below or see the discussion page.

Composer: Anonymous (often misattrib. to William Byrd)

Number of voices: 3vv   Voicing: SSA, SAB or SATB
Genre: SacredCanon

Language: Latin
Instruments: a cappella

Description: This famous canon at the fifth and unison or octave is now generally accepted by musicologists as not having been written by William Byrd (1542/3–1623); the late, eminent Byrd specialist Philip Brett came to the view that most of the canons attributed to Byrd were spurious.
Recent research has shown that the two related figures which form the basis of the Non nobis, Domine canon were extracted from the 5-voice motet Aspice Domine by Philip van Wilder (c. 1500–1554). In the motet both figures are set to the text-phrase Non est qui consoletur (“there is none to console”) which was presumably the text to which the original version of the canon was sung by the Elizabethan recusant community as an expression of nostalgia for the old religious order. The Non nobis, Domine text to which the canon is sung today was apparently taken from the first collect from the thanksgiving service added to the Book of Common Prayer to celebrate the thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot on 5 November 1605.
The earliest source of the canon dates from 1620 to 1625 and is preserved in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, in the “Bull” manuscript, MS 782, f.122v, where it is anonymous, unbarred and untexted. It is however clear from the repeated notes and the contour of the melody that this version was already designed to fit the Non nobis, Domine text, which was evidently sung in a spirit of thanksgiving for deliverance.
The canon was published anonymously in three 17th century collections, yet the earliest attribution to a specific composer was made as late as 1715 by Thomas Tudway, who ascribed it to Morley; the woefully inaccurate Dr Pepusch ascribes it to Byrd in his 1731 Treatise on Harmony; and in 1739 the theme is quoted in a concerto by Count Unico Willem van Wassenaer (formerly attributed to Pergolesi) as Canone di Palestrina! The canon is known to have been admired by Mozart and Beethoven, whomever its composer was. — Philip Legge with additions by David Humphreys

Original text and translations

Original text and translations may be found at Psalm 115.